Ransackers Research Forum and AGM

“Learning from co-researchers: health, wellbeing and avoiding isolation”

10:00 – 16:00 on October 14th, 2019
Committee Room 1, Crowndale Centre, 218 Eversholt St, London NW1 1BD
(Mornington Crescent tube)

Book this FREE event: via Eventbrite,  or email Hilary Farnworth

Download Flyer – 2019 Research Forum and AGM for full details

 

 

 

The Fashion Trade: Past, Present and Future?

We have a fashion problem. No, I don’t just mean that older women often struggle to find clothes they like/can wear/can afford on the high street. Professor Julia Twigg has written about this – how older women ‘have long been subject to social pressure to tone down, to adopt self-effacing, covered-up styles’, although she says to some extent this might be changing. To me the bigger picture is that the fashion industry is one of the biggest polluters in the world (Lindsay Brown, 2019), using massive quantities of water and producing waste. Did you know that when people return clothes bought online on a ‘try before you buy’ basis, it is common for the returned clothing to end up in landfill? (Harriet Constable,BBC). The drive towards cheaper and cheaper clothes – some worn just once or twice – also means that poorly paid garment workers in low income countries work for long hours in unsafe conditions.

However, many younger people are becoming more active in fighting climate change and recognising that everybody’s well-being is ‘corrupted and compromised by the political and economic systems that promote and support our modern, consumer-focussed lifestyles’ (Extinction Rebellion) I argue that working for change in the way we produce and use clothing is one area where older generations can contribute to thinking differently about what we are doing.

I remember wartime and post-WW2 austerity and make-do-and-mend. Fabrics were in short supply so people had to be inventive: wedding dresses made out of curtains, socks for the troops hand-knitted, clothes and shoes repaired and passed along until they could not be repaired any more. The expectation was for things to last and be cherished, not thrown out after a few wears because ‘fashion’ changed.

So it is encouraging that there has been a move by some young people to shake things up a bit by making businesses that re-use clothes instead of letting them be thrown away (Sarah Butler, 2018, The Guardian). I believe that those of us who are old enough to remember how to improvise, how to alter and adapt clothing, and how to repair and mend, have a lot to offer younger people by sharing these skills. It will be a small contribution to cutting down on the waste of energy and water, but a big contribution to intergenerational understanding and changing how we all think about the clothes that we wear.

Teresa Lefort in conversation with Caroline Holland

Please feedback on this topic. All contributions to the debate gratefully received.

Time to Rethink Adult Education?

Adult education is in crisis: decades of cuts in funding has led to a decline in courses offered for adult learners and around 1.8 million adults per year are not able to access courses to improve their skills (David Hughes, TES, September 2018).

But, unfortunately, the common discourse around adult education is linked to skills for employability and boosting the economy: what about education for the sake of education? Until 2017, I was the head of the Department for International Labour and Trade Union Studies (ILTUS) at Ruskin College, Oxford, an institution founded on the values of education as emancipation for the working class. We actively encouraged adults to study on a wide range of programmes that could, of course, help them to progress in their careers, but, more importantly, to develop critical thinking that can bring about social change.  My oldest student was a man in his 80’s, who had been a success in business but never had the opportunity to study a higher education course. He wasn’t there to improve his chances of getting a better job or promotion in the workplace: he was there to read, listen, think, discuss and debate with the other students (and staff, which was encouraged!)

With the obsession with education and employability, educators find themselves in a situation where everything has to be linked to the chance of the student getting a job at the end: from lesson plans to OFSTED (the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills, which inspects institutions with students up to the age of 18), and organisations such as Advance HE, teaching has become more about ‘social mobility’ through employment than challenging the status quo. Are we there to produce yet another generation of automatons, who accept low paid, low valued work, zero- hour contracts, when they should be challenging the whole concept of the way work is constructed?

There is a light at the end of the tunnel (well, I think so!): The Cooperative University Project. As a founder member of a new educational worker cooperative, the RED Learning Coop: Research, Education and Development for Social Change, I was thrilled for us to be invited to be part of the development of this exciting initiative. In 2012, the Cooperative College in Manchester, started to explore ideas about ‘doing education differently’ and the 2017 Higher Education Act gave the space for alternative providers. So, what is different about a Cooperative University? Well, the vision for a start:

‘Our vision is to develop a new type of university based on social justice and co-operative values and principles which works for the mutual benefit of all.

A Co-operative University will empower students, enhancing their skills to develop new ways of thinking, working, researching and learning for life’ (Cooperative College website, April 2019).

The University is founded on Cooperative Values and Principles:

  • Challenge injustice, inequality and exploitation in all its forms.
  • Recognise that teachers and students have much to learn from each other and should work together to design and develop content and delivery.
  • Be based on a social purpose and political and economic democracy
  • Enhance wellbeing and enable everyone to explore their full range of abilities.
  • Strengthen and grow a different kind of society with co-operative values at its heart

(Cooperative College Website, April 2019).

The first course starts in September 2019, so watch this space!

Tracy Walsh

Founder Member of The RED Learning Cooperative: Research, Education and Development.

Have your say to the Adult Education Commission

Workshop: Thursday, May 30th 2019, 11.00 to 1600
Location: Futurelearn, 1-11 Hawley Crescent, Camden Town, London NW1 8NP run by AEA (Association for  Education and Ageing)

AEA present: Older Adult Education and Learning: the way forward

Ransackers supports this workshop and invites any later life learners who can get to North London to attend.

The Workshop will be discussing the issues, and then putting together a response, to the Adult Education Commission’s Call for ideas and evidence on the way forward for Adult Education in the UK in the future*. The Call comes on the occasion of the centenary of the post WWW1 Ministry of Reconstruction’s hugely important Report to Government, which established the principles of adult education provision in the UK up to the 1990s.

This Workshop will focus on the education and learning of older people in the UK in the next decades and collect together views and arguments that will be forwarded to the Commission after the workshop. A central issue will be the role of the State.

The format on May 30 will be a pre-workshop collection of responses to the introductory document, introductory short inputs, small group working sessions and concluding debate.

All welcome. Free attendance
*See https://www.wea.org.uk/get-involved/our-campaigns/adult-education-100

AGE/NCY: Art, Ageing and Transition

An exciting (and free) Tate Modern workshop organised by Flourishing Lives in collaboration with several artists, community groups and organisations, including Age Allies (Age UK London)

26–28 APRIL 2019, Blavatnik Building, Level 5

https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/tate-exchange/workshop/agency-art-ageing-and-transition

Age Allies have developed a plan of the Tate Modern exhibitor space, which is conceptualised as a board game, ‘Continuum

Research group Penzance

Helen Davies

I did Ransackers in 2008 and 2009. I was inspired by Kathleen Hughes to set up a U3A Research group in Penzance and below are some of the group’s research findings.


Llyn Aubrey

I became interested in u3a as there was very little to engage me in Penzance. I’ve been delighted to see it grow and become a very worthwhile organisation. Joining the research group was a big interest of mine having made films in the local area; two of which were broadcast on C4. I have also been a representative for Cornwall at the then called International Film and TV organisation. This festival goes around Scotland, Wales, Eire, N. Ireland and Brittany, showing films that represent local talent and interest. It is something that I am no longer involved with but researching ideas is something I am keen on.

Helen had been involved in fabulous research, having had a grant to do so, and very involved in her local community.

I really like the idea of the owner of a local house and gardens being originally a slave owner, back in the 1700. Very fascinating, as that is very unusual in this local area which at one time was very fabulously rich, on the backs of mining. In fact, the richest place in the UK in the mid 1800.

This area has a fascinating history, a very good private library, which has numerous books on local knowledge and is an area very renowned for its art. I feel the group is very talented and keen to press forward with its ideas, the meetings are very lively!

Continue reading “Research group Penzance”